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Posts Tagged ‘cosmetics’

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If a red, raised area suddenly appears on your face for no reason and doesn’t go away no matter how much balm or coconut oil you put on it, you might be dealing with unwanted bacteria from a skin care product, cosmetic or makeup brush. Staphylococcus, candida and e.coli are just some of the microbes that can be found in expired, abused (not stored properly) or under-preserved formula.

You will need to treat this area with an antibiotic ointment and/or anti-microbial essential oils. The most effective oils against staph are cinnamon, oregano, clove thyme and savory. These potent oils can be irritating to the skin so must be diluted to a maximum of 1%. You don’t want to further inflame the area. If it still doesn’t go away or improve after one day, visit your doctor. This is not something you want to mess with.

Prevention Tips

  • Throw out whatever you used before the infection appeared. You will probably know exactly what it was – something old or maybe a DIY formula.
  • Stay on top of your product’s expiry date. It will either be printed somewhere on the bottle or you will see a symbol of an open jar with a number inside that will indicate how many months after opening you can use it.
  • When you’re buying from small batch producers, ask them about the preservative that they use. If they say none, be skeptical. This is not a responsible way to create products and there are many great non-toxic, sustainable preservatives out there.
  • Buy products and use them up THEN buy more. Don’t stockpile them in your closet to never be seen again. If you don’t like it, throw it away or give it to someone that does.
  • Clean your make up brushes regularly.

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The World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) just released State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals, a disturbing report that takes on the linkbetweenendocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and disease in both humans and wildlife. It calls for more research, testing, reporting, and collaboration between scientific communities and countries. “Chemical products are increasingly part of modern life and support many national economies, but the unsound management of chemicals challenges the achievement of key development goals, and sustainable development for all,” said UN Under Secretary-General and UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner. more…

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It has recently been discovered that some very large companies have been allowing their products to be tested on animals in China in order to sell them within the country. These companies are Estee Lauder, Avon, Mary Kay, and Mac Cosmetics.

The government of China has very strict standards for allowing cosmetics to be sold, probably the most stringent in the world. One of the requirements is for each ingredient and formula to be tested on animals by one of their authorized institutions. The testing is performed on the animals’ eyes and skin. Bottom line, if a cosmetic is sold in China, it has likely been tested on animals. I say ‘likely’ because they do seem to be creating a database of test results in order to not have to duplicate testing on certain ingredients. It’s unclear as to whether some products wouldn’t have to be tested on animals at all based on previous tests completed. 

The companies mentioned above previously had 100% cruelty-free policies but are now making   statements on their websites such as this one (taken from Estée Lauder’s FAQ page):

DOES YOUR COMPANY TEST ON ANIMALS? 
The Estée Lauder Companies Inc. is committed to the elimination of animal testing. We are equally committed to consumer health and safety, and bringing to market products that comply with applicable regulations in every country in which our products are sold. We do not conduct animal testing on our products or ingredients, nor ask others to test on our behalf, except when required by law. We evaluate our finished products in clinical tests on volunteer panels. 

Note the “except when required by law”. All the Estée Lauder companies seem to use this verbiage even though they may not be sold in China. These companies include Aveda, Bobbi Brown, Bumble and Bumble, Clinique, Darphin, Jo Malone, La Mer, Origins, and Smashbox (very sad since they used to use the PETA symbol for cruelty-free). 

Cocoon Apothecary‘s policy is that we will never ever ever test on animals even in China, never.

Cocoon Apothecary Cruelty Free and Vegan

 

 

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With all this talk of Easter bunnies going on, it seems like a good time to rat out the companies that still test on them. 

 Church & Dwight
Aim
Arm & Hammer
Close-up      

Procter & Gamble
Always
Aussie
Clairol
Crest
Gilette
Gorgio Armani
Head & Shoulders
Ivory
Max Factor
Olay
Old Spice
Pantene
Physique
Secret
Zest     

Church & Dwight
Arrid
Nair  

Johnson & Johnson
Aveeno
Clean & Clear
Listerine
Lubriderm
Neutrogena
Rembrandt    

Unilever
Axe
Dove
Lux
Ponds
Suave
Sunsilk
Vaseline

Schering-Plough
Bain de Soleil
Coppertone   

Playtex Products
Banana Boat
Hawaiian Tropic      

L’Oreal
Biotherm
Cacharel
Garnier
Helena Rubinstein
Lancôme
Matrix Essentials
Maybelline
Ralph Lauren Fragrances
Redken
SoftSheen
Vichy          

Colgate-Palmolive Co.
Mennen
Speed Stick
Softsoap 

Dial Corporation
Dry Idea
Right Guard
Soft & Dri
Soft Scrub

Mead   

Melaleuca     

New Dana Perfumes        

Reckitt Benckiser
Old English
Veet

So now you know what not to buy. I don’t want to get into the gruesome details of what is done to animals for cosmetic purposes, but I can tell you this – it is wrong, unnecessary and needs to be stopped.  For more information, visit www.caringconsumer.com.

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Ever heard of nanotechnology? It is all the rage in labs right now and it’s been slipped into your cosmetics without you even knowing.  Nanoparticles are substances that have been manipulated into very, very, very small particles – we’re talking 1/100 000 the width of a human hair. You won’t be able to find them on the shelf because nano labelling is not required by Health Canada or the FDA.

One of the top human health concerns is that  these substances penetrate into the bloodstream and the lymph system and damage tissue.  Surprisingly, the Environmental Working Group has approved  nanotitanium and nanozinc for use in natural sunscreens.  I am not convinced.

Another HUGE concern is its effect on eco-systems. A recent studyhas shown that nanoparticles in sunscreen (zinc & titanium) damage bacteria in water.

Fortunately, the European Union has recently decided to regulate nanoparticles in cosmetics with calls for more research. It will be interesting to see what evidence will be revealed over the next few years.

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